Curriculum

The curriculum offered at Ruislip High School is a balance between traditional subjects combined with some vocational subjects at Key Stages 4 and 5.

Key Stage 3

In Year 7, students are taught in their form class for all subjects except Design and Technology (smaller classes) and Mathematics where student are grouped in to broad levels of ability. Ruislip High School believes in allowing students to benefit from mixed-ability teaching whilst they adjust to their new school. The school’s priority in Year 7 is to ensure all students make a successful transition to secondary education. The school’s teachers are highly skilled at ensuring that all students fulfil their potential in lessons and are able to differentiate lessons to ensure that all students are challenged and make the expected progress.

In Year 8 and 9, students continue to be set in Mathematics.

The curriculum at Key Stage 3 is as follows:

  • English
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Design and Technology
  • ICT
  • History
  • Geography
  • French or Spanish
  • Art
  • Drama
  • Music
  • Physical Education
  • Cultural Studies (Citizenship, Religious Education. Personal, Social and Health Education)

Additionally, students needing additional support, especially for literacy, receive intensive intervention.  Students not reaching expected levels of attainment on transition to high school, participate with their parent/guardian, in our Core kick-start evening school from June to October (Year 6-7).

In Year 9, students opt to specialise in one area of Design and Technology (Product Design, Catering or Textiles) and begin their GCSE course in their GCSE choice in either Citizenship or Religious Education.

Key Stage 4

In Year 9, students are supported through the process of selecting their options for Key Stage 4 at Ruislip High School; the process begins early so that there is plenty of time to allow students and parents to make this important decision. The school recognises that this is an important time for all students and is therefore committed to providing support and guidance to ensure each student makes the right choice for his/her future. The option booklet provides comprehensive information about the different courses; in addition, four pathways have been set up to help guide students and parents, which are as follows:

Pathway 1 – English Baccalaureate:

GCSE Mathematics, English Language, English Literature, Triple Science (some student study Double Science), Short Course RE (Year 10 students are studying the full course, Year 11 students are studying for the short course or for the IT European Driving Licence qualification) and core PE. Students also choose one Modern Foreign Language, one Humanities (History or Geography) and any other two GCSEs from the optional courses.

Pathway 2 – Full GCSE Course:

In addition to GCSE Mathematics, English Language, English Literature, Triple or Double Science, Short Course RE (Year 10 students are studying the full course, Year 11 students are studying for the short course or for the IT European Driving Licence qualification) and core PE, students choose any four GCSEs from the optional courses.

Pathway 3 – Mixed GCSE and BTEC Course:

In addition to GCSE Mathematics, English Language, English Literature, and Science (Double Science or BTEC), Short Course RE (Year 10 students are studying the full course, Year 11 students are studying for the short course or for the IT European Driving Licence qualification) and core PE, students choose one BTEC option and any three GCSE options.

Pathway 4 – Reduced GCSE and BTEC Course:

In addition to GCSE Mathematics, English Language, English Literature, and Science and RE (Year 10 students are studying the full course, Year 11 students are studying for the short course or for the IT European Driving Licence qualification) and core PE, students are provided with additional staffed study in English and Mathematics time, and are encouraged to choose one BTEC option in addition to two further GCSE courses.

Optional Courses:

GCSE: Art, Business Studies, Child Development, Drama, Food Technology, French, Geography, History, Graphics, History, ICT, Latin (from September 2015), Media Studies, Music, Physical Education, Resistant Materials, Spanish, Textiles.

BTEC: Travel and Tourism

Key Stage 5

The Ruislip High School Sixth Form started in September 2011 and the curriculum offered is as follows:

AS / A2 level courses at Ruislip High School

  • Art
  • Biology
  • Business Studies
  • Chemistry
  • Drama
  • English Language
  • English Literature
  • Food Technology
  • Further Mathematics
  • Geography
  • Government and Politics
  • History
  • ICT
  • Mathematics
  • Media Studies
  • Physics
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Product Design - Graphics
  • Product Design - Resistant Materials
  • Textiles

BTEC courses at Ruislip High School

  • Leisure and Tourism
  • Sport

A Level courses at Bishop Ramsey CE School

  • Economics
  • French
  • Music
  • Physical Education
  • Photography

The school encourages all students to take four subjects in Year 12 (minimum of three) and the majority of students continue with three into Year 13. In addition, all students are encouraged to take the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) which is equivalent to one AS level and highly respected by the Russell Group universities. The students begin their research in the summer term of Year 12.

The school is in a Sixth Form partnership with Bishop Ramsey School where students are able to study a subject that is not offered by Ruislip High School.

School Council

What is a School Council?

Our school council is a representative group of students who have been elected by their peers to represent the views of students and to raise issues within the school.

The school council can also propose and take forward initiatives and projects on behalf of their peers, and be involved in strategic planning and processes such as school development, meeting of visitors and staff appointments.

The object of an effective School Councils is to help our students to:

  • enjoy and feel empowered by their education
  • feel that their school responds to their needs and views
  • have the opportunity to let adults know their feelings and opinions about things that affect them
  • have a say about decisions, and to play an active role in making their school a better place
  • develop life skills through participation